EFF Founder Honored With 2015 Rachel Carson Award

The National Audubon Society presented Flo Stone, Founder and President Emerita of the Environmental Film Festival in the Nation’s Capital, with the Rachel Carson Award at The Plaza Hotel in New York City on May 20. The prestigious Audubon award, presented at the Society’s 12th annual Women in Conservation Luncheon, recognizes visionary women whose dedication, talent and energy have advanced positive change in environmental and conservation locally and on a global scale. The Award was also presented to Warrie Price, Founder and President, The Battery Conservancy.

“Audubon New York is proud to honor Flo Stone and Warrie Price as the 2015 Rachel Carson Award recipients,” said Audubon New York Executive Director Erin Crotty. “We thank them for their bold vision, entrepreneurial spirit, and persistence.” Allison Whipple Rockefeller, the founding chair of the Rachel Carson Awards Council, spoke at the ceremony with a nod to the Award’s namesake and honorees.

“Women helped start Audubon more than a hundred years ago and have played a leading role in conservation ever since. That’s what we’re celebrating today – women who have truly made a difference.” said Audubon President and CEO David Yarnold. “And we hope that by honoring their example, we’ll inspire the next generation of women and girls to aim high. Women understand that we all need clean air, clean water and healthy natural spaces, and they’re willing to do something about it.”

Emcee NBC Chief Environmental Affairs Correspondent Anne Thompson, remarked on the historical legacy of American women in conservation and challenges female environmental reporters face. This year Audubon also recognized a special group of women with the “Women Greening Journalism” special recognition, celebrating the efforts of American women whose work has advanced environmental journalism by using “the power of the pen” to inform citizens, spark debate and ignite change for conservation. Recipients included Emily Atkin (ThinkProgress), Jennifer Bogo (Popular Science), Rene Ebersole (Audubon magazine), Suzanne Goldenberg (The Guardian), Lisa Friedman (ClimateWire), Kate Sheppard (Huffington Post), Amy Westervelt (The Guardian UK and Wall Street Journal) among others.

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